метко сказанное русское слово

First published 21 April 2019 @ Listen, Learn, Read

Сердцеведением и мудрым познаньем жизни отзовётся слово британца; лёгким щёголем блеснёт и разлетится недолговечное слово француза; затейливо придумает своё, не всякому доступное, умно-худощавое слово немец; но нет слова, которое было бы так замашисто, бойко, так вырвалось бы из-под самого сердца, так бы кипело и животрепетало, как метко сказанное русское слово.

With a profound knowledge of the heart and a wise grasp of life will the word of the Briton echo; like an airy dandy will the impermanent word of the Frenchman flash and then burst into smithereens; finickily, intricately will the German contrive his intellectually gaunt word, which is not within the easy reach of everybody. But there is never a word which can be so sweeping, so boisterous, which would burst out so, from out of the very heart, which would seethe so and quiver and flutter so much like a living thing, as an aptly uttered Russian word!

I learned my Russian (I flatter myself that I know it rather well) from my mum. She wasn’t a language teacher: she taught PE, art and technical drawing at school. Although her mother tongue was Ukrainian, she spoke it rarely and did not attempt to teach us any. I remember just a few of Ukrainian sayings [1], and she would mark those as such, often introducing them with «как говорил/а …» (“as … said”) [2]. Her written Russian was impeccable (I don’t recall a single spelling or grammatical mistake in her letters, no corrections either, but clearly I am not objective here), while her spoken language was simple and sophisticated at the same time. And she always found a perfect time and place for that aptly uttered Russian word.

The sources of those words were too many, ranging from colloquialisms, folk songs and proverbs to Krylov, Pushkin, Gogol to modern authors, like Vysotsky and Zhvanetsky.

Sometimes she deliberately used a patently non-standard [3] or “illiterate” word, typically borrowed from her students (e.g. чумадан instead of чемодан).

Here is a list of some words and expressions of велимог [4] I heard from my mum a lot. It’s very incomplete but, as she used to say, хорошего понемножку.

__________________________________________________

  1. Here they are, all four of them.
    1. Їж, поки рот свіж.
    2. Коли як, коли як (коли збуваються, коли ні).
    3. На тобі, Боже, що мені негоже.
    4. Що ваші роблять? — Пообідали та й хліб жують!
  2. She would always give the due credit for Russian sayings too.
  3. For example, back-formed words, such as одуванодуванчик, пёхомпешком, толкачи ← толкачики.
  4. Short for «великий, могучий, правдивый и свободный русский язык», “great, mighty, true and free Russian language” (after Turgenev).
  5. The word фазенда (fazenda) became popular in the USSR after the Brazilian soap opera Escrava Isaura.
Advertisements

в январе, первого апреля

When I was little, I thought that instead of «День космонавтики» (Cosmonautics Day) one should say «День космонавтиков».

Allow me to explain. I had no clue what космонавтика (cosmonautics) is but did know the word космонавт (cosmonaut) from which, naturally enough, I could form a diminutive космонавтик, i.e. a little cosmonaut. Therefore, «День космонавтиков» (Day of little cosmonauts) makes a lot of sense and is grammatically correct, since the word космонавтиков is in genitive, while «День космонавтики» does not because космонавтики stay in nominative. See what I mean?

Oh, here he goes again, I hear you saying, with those Russian cases. And you’ll be absolutely right. You may recall that we need a number of cases to express the time of day. Today you will see that to talk about time in general (day, date etc.) we need all six (or seven) of them.

Дело было в январе,
Первого апреля.
Было жарко во дворе,
Мы окоченели.

Anonymous

As mentioned before, Russian names for days of the week are more interesting (or, at least, less trivial) than names of the months. I trust you already know them. Now, let’s try to say what day it is today.

Сегодня пятница, двенадцатое апреля две тысячи девятнадцатого года.

(Today is Friday, the twelfth of April of the year two thousand nineteen.)

Note that both the noun пятница and the numeral двенадцатое are in nominative, while the month апреля and year две тысячи девятнадцатого года are in genitive. This can be conveniently translated to English with the help of the preposition “of”.

There is another, equally correct, way to say the same:

Сегодня пятница, двенадцатого апреля две тысячи девятнадцатого года.

Here the numeral двенадцатого is in genitive [1].

Let’s organise some event on that date.

Мы встречаемся в пятницу, двенадцатого апреля две тысячи девятнадцатого года.

(We meet on Friday, the twelfth of April of the year two thousand nineteen.)

Here the date has to be in genitive: двенадцатого апреля, not двенадцатое апреля. But what about Friday? We use the preposition в + accusative: в пятницу, just like we do with hours, e.g. в три часа. In general, days (of the week, holidays, birthdays) require accusative, whether we need the prepositions (в or на) or not: в День космонавтики, на мой день рождения, каждую пятницу, в следующие выходные etc.

В какой день недели, в котором часу
Ты выйдешь ко мне осторожно,
Когда я тебя на руках унесу
Туда, где найти невозможно.

Владимир Высоцкий, «Лирическая»

If we talk about events happening during the week, we need на followed by prepositional case: на прошлой неделе, на следующей неделе, на Страстной неделе and so on. The на + prepositional is also used for particular times of the day: на заре “at dawn” and на закате “at sunset”, in literal as well as in figurative sense: на заре цивилизации
“at the dawn of civilization”.

The preposition в takes prepositional case when we talk about events during the periods of time longer than a week: в апреле, в прошлом году [2], в первом квартале, в двадцатом веке, в каменном веке, в первом тысячелетии. However, if such periods have names that employ genitive, as in год Дракона “Year of the Dragon” or век пара “Age of Steam”, we have to apply the accusative again: в год Дракона, в годы войны, в век пара and so on.

В эпоху войн, в эпоху кризисов,
Когда действительность страшна,
У засекреченного физика
Была красивая жена.

Валерий Бурилов

Events on geologic time scale could be expressed in either accusative or prepositional: в юрский период or в юрском периоде, в мезозойскую эру or в мезозойской эре.

Accusative is needed when we talk about the entire time period, e.g. целый год, or when such period is mentioned in combination with an ordinal numeral, e.g. третий год.

Закричал он:
— Что за шутки!
Еду я вторые сутки,
А приехал я назад,
А приехал в Ленинград!

С. Я. Маршак, «Вот какой рассеянный»

We also can utilise the accusative construction на … год instead of more common в … году:

Сколько я лет с раздушкой знался,
На последний год расстался.

«Дарю платок» (народная)

When we need to indicate duration of time (from… to…), we use either с + genitive / до + genitive construction, e.g. с понедельника до пятницы, or с + genitive / по + accusative, e.g. с понедельника по пятницу.

The dative is used in combination with preposition к in the sense “by”, e.g. к следующей пятнице, к лету, к Новому году. For recurring events, we apply the dative plural: по пятницам, по чётным дням, по выходным.

По утрам, надев трусы,
Не забудьте про часы.

Finally, we resort to the instrumental case for events happening at particular time of day, e.g. ранним утром, or particular season, e.g. раннней весной, прошлой зимой.

Дело было вечером,
Делать было нечего.

Сергей Михалков, «А что у вас?»

Зелёною весной
Под старою сосной
С любимою Ванюша прощается.

Леонид Дербенёв, «Кап-кап-кап»

We need the instrumental to congratulate with any event:

Поздравляю с праздником!

This formula is so common that the word поздравлять is normally dropped, so the congratulation is reduced to just с + instrumental: с днём рождения, с Рождеством, с Новым годом, с днём космонавтики etc.

Case Usage Example
Nominative diary entries пятница, двенадцатое апреля, час дня
Genitive dates двенадцатого апреля две тысячи девятнадцатого года
M minutes to H hour без пяти
from… to… с понедельника до пятницы
Dative by… к девяти часам, к следующей пятнице
recurring events по пятницам, по ночам
Accusative events at particular time в два часа, в половину четвёртого
events on days в пятницу
until… по пятницу
events during the year на следующий год
events during periods that use genitive в годы войны
events on geologic time scale в юрский период
whole period прошлую неделю, всё лето, круглый год
ordinal numeral + period четвертые сутки, первую неделю
Instrumental events during the time of day ранним утром
events during the season поздней осенью
Prepositional sun-related events of the day на заре, на закате
events during the week на прошлой неделе
events during the longer periods of time в апреле, в XIX веке
events on geologic time scale в юрском периоде
Locative events during the hour во втором часу
events during the year в 2019-ом году; на 50-ом году жизни
events during the lifetime на моём веку́

__________________________________________________

  1. Only a century or so ago, say more or less until the October revolution, the dates were expressed somewhat differently. For example, 12.04.1919 would be «тысяча девятьсот девятнадцатого года апреля двенадцатого дня», literally “of the year one thousand nine hundred nineteen of April of the twelfth day”. Here everything is in genitive, which kind of makes sense — almost. The genitive case shows that something belongs to something else: the month belongs to the year and the day belongs to the month. It is like a Russian doll. Nevertheless, you’d expect the innermost doll, i.e. day, to be in nominative. But here we have дня, not день. Why? Could it be that the “day doll” actually has another doll inside, viz. that of the implied event?
  2. More precisely, we employ в + locative with год (“year”) → в году́.